Only fear

It is only fear. Not a big deal, if you think clearly. No, I am not forgetting that when you are afraid, something inexplicable happens to your think-clearly cluster of grey matter. But, strange as it may seem, it is the very key to getting rid of all your angst. Think clearly, reason and drive the vile thing out.

Why get rid of fear? Well, not just because you get tagged a wimp, but also because of darker, scarier places it locks you up in. That should suffice as an answer. If it doesn’t you probably belong to a group of people who believe fear is positive for motivation. Well, not always. And this post is about those other times.

That brings us to the question of how thinking clearly will help. It is very complicated to even begin attempting it, very simple to talk about. I am picking the easier of the two, and writing on how I believe you can stop fear from savaging you.

I have always believed that my set of fears (yes, I admit here and now, there is a set of fears in my secret box) have accumulated over the years because I am too afraid of telling them to get the hell out of my life. They get collected, without my knowledge, mostly. And when I do notice the latest addition, I am too smashed under the load of others to yell “Get out”. What disturbs me the most about fear is what it makes you do, at times. If you look deeply, almost every action you scorn, laugh, scowl at in others (or, if you are brave, in yourself) is a result of some sort of fear. Let me explain with examples. I am told I use semantics, and vaguely, too.

Example 1. Ms. J

Behaviour: Nasty, irritable, hot-tongued

Fear: Afraid someone will someday tell her on her face that she was wrong about her claims that she would make a great entrepreneur. She’s not an entrepreneur. She sits at home and makes life miserable. For everyone.

Connection: She would die before hearing about her failure (a failure possibly only she sees) from others. Preempting people’s reactions, she acts and reacts to imaginary pointing fingers. Frustrated with her fear of failure and consequent embarrassment, she is all set to rock people’s boats before they do hers.

Is anyone interested in rocking her boat? No. Sadly, she’s doing it herself.

Example 2: Mr. F

Behaviour: Constantly ‘in-touch’ with people, volunteering running errands, giving advice, hosting meals.. an endless list

Fear: Of loneliness

Connection: This one is quite simple, really. He doesn’t want to face a moment without ‘someone’ to make him feel wanted and appreciated. He is running around with his bag, collecting camaraderie. Sometimes it does help. Sometimes it makes him an obsessive fool, afraid to be with his own self. The loneliness doesn’t go, because as people say, you must be friends with yourself first.

Could Mr. F shake hands with himself? No. Sadly, he’s more lonely than he ever was.

Fear makes me shudder.

I’ve handled some of my own, mind you. Well, my lily liver is not watery all the way. And the only thing that has helped me get past  these… things is the knowledge that

a. I am afraid

b. I don’t need to be

I may not be much of an expert on this, but this page proves I am not alone when I talk of the importance of points a. and b. above.

So, my mantra for shooing away weeds of angst is taking the first step of admitting there is a certain fear. Of coming early for an appointment, of painting the worst painting of the century, of turning around and seeing my Maths teacher grinning at me.. Oh there are plenty, still.

You see, the moment I accept there is a certain fear, its consequences flash very succinctly in my head. That’s when I am able to (mostly) choose “You won’t get me.” over “Yes, master.”

Yeah. One day my set will be non-existent. I am getting there.

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6 thoughts on “Only fear”

  1. Nicely-written and very honest. I think you’ve touched on an important idea here: everyone is afraid. We all show it in different ways, but very few take the time to look inward and really try to sort it out. You may never succeed in ridding yourself completely of fear, but this blog is a great step. I will try to come back and read more. Don’t give up!

  2. Yes, I also think it’s a great post. It’s honest and fearless of you to have written it.

    I’ve recently started showing some of my doodles and self-indulgent writings (tagged as sketches and wordages, mostly) and am enjoying doing so because other people find them entertaining. They are things I’d have been scared to share at one time, as I also have a tendency towards perfectionism.

    1. Your work is good and entertaining, indeed. I especially loved your artwork. I intend to go right back and read the articles again and tell you exactly what I liked about them. Though I opened PartialView in August last year, I only began adding the stuff I’d written years back this September. Since then, I find reasons to write, analyse what I’ve written, and let it fly into the cyberspace, not worrying much. It gives me a lot of pleasure to read feedback from good people such as you. My fear of criticism is vanishing. And surprisingly, appreciation is making me braver and more open to faults. Kudos to blogging!

      1. Actually, yes, this is something I was going to say to you (but I lost track of which post I wanted to say in beneath!) – blogging is very freeing once one starts making contact with people and getting feedback (positive feedback, that is. Like you, I’m not wild about unpleasant stuff coming my way).

        Thanks for the compliments on my art. Enjoy!
        🙂

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